Skip to content
Bureau of Market Research

Latest news

SOUTH AFRICAN HOUSEHOLD WEALTH INDEX, Q4 2015 (15-04-2015)

The strength or weakness of households’ balance sheets as reflected by their liabilities, assets and net wealth, count among some of the most important economic indicators in South Africa. Analysis of the balance sheet provides valuable information on the sufficiency of households’ savings, their retirement prospects, affordability of debt and lifestyle expectations. Also, a strong balance sheet is needed for households to be financially well, which, in turn is essential for their resilience to deal with shocks and to contribute to economic growth. In contrast, declining or weak household net wealth makes strong economic growth and employment virtually impossible.

For more information, click here.

CONSUMER FINANCIAL VULNERABLITY INDEX (CFVI), Q4 2015 (15-04-2016)

The average South African consumer experienced a heavy burden on their cash flow during Q4 2015. The MMI Unisa (CFVI) recorded a value of 50.9 index points in Q4 2015, which is down from 52.7 points recorded for Q1 2015. The CFVI has shown a downward trajectory since Q1 2012 when it was 58.9 index points. According to the CFVI measurement scale, consumers in general still perceived their financial situati on to be mildly exposed during Q4 2015, although just barely as the Index was on the brink of being classifi ed as fi nancially very exposed. When seen in conjuncti on with prevailing circumstances in the local economy, there is a real risk that consumers may become very exposed during 2016.

For more information, click here.

2016 YOUTH RESEARCH CONFERENCE, 12 & 13 April, UNISA Muckleneuk Campus (22-04-2016)

Click here for presentations.

PERSONAL INCOME ESTIMATES FOR SOUTH AFRICA, 2011 – 2015 (09-10-2015)

The research focus of the Bureau of Market Research’s 2015 personal income study was to estimate the magnitude of personal income in South Africa during 2015 while providing revised estimates for 2011 – 2014 based on a 2015 South African Reserve Bank rebasing of national accounts figures for South Africa. The said research is contained in a report entitled Personal income estimates for South Africa, 2011 to 2015 authored by Ms Marietjie Coetzee and Prof Carel van Aardt from the BMR’s Household Wealth Research Division.

For the contents and preface of report 464, click here.

MOMENTUM/UNISA SOUTH AFRICAN HOUSEHOLD FINANCIAL WELLNESS INDEX, 2014 (29-09-2015)

The state of South African households’ financial wellness* improved further in 2014. In real terms, the Momentum/Unisa South African Household Financial Wellness Index increased to an average level of 66.64 points in 2014 from 65.93 points in 2013.

An increasing trend in the average state of household financial wellness signifies resilience that emanates from households’ ability to adjust to and overcome adverse events and circumstances. The increase in the state of households’ financial wellness during 2014 as measured by the Momentum/Unisa South African Household Financial wellness Index exemplifies such resilience — as it happened despite a number of setbacks that exerted negative pressure on households’ financial wellness.

Such setbacks include a five-month long labour strike in the platinum sector, a 75 basis point increase in the repo and prime interest rates, a lack of sufficient infrastructure and a volatile and deteriorating international economic environment.

For more information, click here.

HAPPINESS INDEX, 2015 (27-08-2015)

At the 2012 Behavioural and Communication Research Division meeting, the Bureau of Market Research (BMR) proposed the construction of a prototype Happiness Index for South Africa. With the support of the Projects Committee members and Unisa, the BMR embarked on this pioneering work and constructed a first ever Happiness Index for South Africa using Unisa alumni members as an experimental group. The rationale for selecting Unisa alumni members as experimental group is based on the fact that this group represents approximately a third of South African graduates who have a profound impact on local business and the economy.

Click here for the preface and contents of Report 463.

CONSUMER FINANCIAL VULNERABILITY INDEX (CFVI) QUARTER 2 - 2015 (20-08-2015)

The average South African consumer experienced a heavy burden on their cash flow during the second quarter of 2015 (Q2 2015). International and domestic uncertainties as well as rising fuel prices, contributed to pressures on especially consumers’ expenditure and debt servicing capabilities, thus influencing their cash flow decisions.

The MBD’s Consumer Financial Vulnerability Index (CFVI) declined to 50.8 points in Q2 2015 from 52.7 points recorded for the preceding quarter. A key informant survey was conducted among a panel of 101 key informants from financial institutions, retailers, municipalities, credit bureaus and cellular phone companies to obtain results for Q2 2015.

For more information, click here.

SECTORAL AND SUBSECTORAL ECONOMIC TRENDS IN SOUTH AFRICA, 1993 TO 2015 (17-08-2015)

This report builds on previous sectoral research published by the Economic Research Division of the Bureau of Market Research (BMR) in 2013 and 2014. In fact, the report expands on prior work and also includes a focus on the number of formal sector businesses per sector, the outputs and volumes produced by such businesses as well as the number of workers employed per sector and the corresponding compensation paid to employees. At the time of compiling the report, the overall economic forecast seemed rather fragile, which largely provided the basis for the sectoral analysis presented in this report. More specifically, the report presents a rich analysis of the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors and subsectors of the South African economy with detailed analysis of the gross value added (GVA) by sectors and subsectors as well as the business sizing of sectors and their corresponding outputs and trading volumes, fixed capital formation, inventories, compensation and employment growth trends since the early 1990s.

Click here for the preface and contents of Report 462.

MID-2015 POPULATION ESTIMATES FOR SOUTH AFRICA BY PROVINCE, DISTRICT AND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY (28-07-2015)

BMR research report 461 ensued from the sustained information needs of corporate BMR sponsor members for updated national, provincial and local population mid-year estimates for South Africa. The report presents mid-2015 population estimates for South Africa and highlights that 80.2% of the South African population are African with Gauteng hosting the largest population (24.0%) as of mid-2015. Valuably, the mid-2015 population estimates are also presented at district municipality level for both population and age cohorts based on the 2011 geographic boundaries.

Click here for the preface and contents of Report 461.

CONSUMER FINANCIAL VULNERABILITY INDEX (CFVI) QUARTER 1 - 2015 (12-06-2015)

Consumers remained mildly exposed in Q1 2015, but the optimism is expected to be counteracted by electricity tariff hikes, load shedding, petrol price increases, limited job creation, adjustments to personal income taxes, tight credit conditions and possible increases in interest rates during 2015.

For more information, click here.

5 YEARS OF THE CONSUMER FINANCIAL VULNERABILITY INDEX (12-06-2015)

For consumers in general, the five most important factors resulting in lower levels of financial vulnerability were reported. These include their marital status, the usage of property insurance to secure the replacement of one of their biggest assets, being content with their lifestyle, saving via call accounts making the money easily assessable and being able to restructure their debt, even though they might have had emolument orders against them. Therefore, the majority of consumers’ financial vulnerability can be reduced by addressing their existence needs. In considering factors specific to certain income groups, a greater emphasis fell on relatedness needs, in addition to existence needs, as income levels increased. More specific to the high income group is their financial knowledge and behaviour through budgeting and sound financial management.

For more information, click here.

LATEST REPORTS PUBLISHED (12-06-2015)

REPORT & DIVISION NO'S TITLE AND AUTHOR

459
(01)

The development of municipal level employability index by applying econometric techniques to census 2011 data to determine the characteristics of the employed by CJ van Aardt, GP Naidoo, KA Parry and DH Tustin
458
All divisions
Drug use and alcohol consumption among secondary school learners in Gauteng, 2014 (Technical Report) by A Basson and DH Tustin
457
(01 & 03)
Macroeconomic and retail trade sales forecast for South Africa, 2015 by CJ van Aardt, DH Tustin and JA van Tonder
456
All divisions
Technical report:  The impact and effect of obsessive exposure to pornography with the potential of dysfunctional transference towards the sexual exploitation of children by A Basson and DH Tustin

455
All divisions

Benchmarking AVI-tourism literacy rates among secondary school learners of Gauteng – a pilot study by N Conradie and DH Tustin

CONSUMER FINANCIAL VULNERABILITY INDEX (CFVI) QUARTER 4 - 2014 (12-02-2015)

South African consumers generally experienced a slight improvement in their personal financial situation during 2014 compared to 2013. According to MBD’s Consumer Financial Vulnerability Index (CFVI), consumers generally felt mildly exposed regarding their cash flow situation during 2014 compared to a very exposed position in 2013. This slight improvement occurred despite their finances being constrained by a number of factors over the course of 2014. These factors include a higher interest rate environment, slow economic and employment growth, some substantial price increases, labour strikes, restricted access to credit and continued high debt levels. In this regard the CFVI revealed that consumers faced significant challenges in servicing their debt during each quarter of 2014.

MID-2014 WARD POPULATION ESTIMATES FOR SOUTH AFRICA (08-02-2015)

The Census is the traditional source of population figures at ward level in South Africa as sample sizes in surveys are usually not large enough to produce population figures at that level. For planning purposes census figures are technically outdated immediately they are released because planners require population figures for the present and possibly for future dates.  In an attempt to meet the demand for current population figures, many organisations produce mid-year population estimates and projections.  These estimates, however, are usually at higher geographical levels.  In view of this a recent study by the Bureau of Market Research (BMR) at the University of South Africa (Unisa) provides population estimates at ward level for all provinces in South Africa as at mid-2014.  The study conducted by Prof Eric Udjo (Head of the Demographic Research Division of the BMR) addresses concerns among planners on the lack of current population estimates at ward level.

BMR STUDY REVEALS DISTURBING FINDINGS ON ONLINE SEXUAL GROOMING AND EXPOSURE OF SCHOOL LEARNERS TO PORNOGRAPHIC MATERIAL (28-01-2015)

The Youth Research Unit (YRU) of the Bureau of Market Research (BMR) within the College of Economic Management Sciences (CEMS) at the University of South Africa (Unisa) recently conducted a ground breaking Internet safety survey among 1 500 secondary school learners in Gauteng. This study follows a series of YRU research projects that aim to establish the usage and impact of Information Communication Technology on the lives of young South Africans. The Gauteng study in particular focuses on the online behaviour and risks experienced by secondary school learners when engaging with the Internet and social networking sites.

HAPPINESS INDEX 2014 (21-01-2015)

The Behavioural and Communication Research Division of the Bureau of Market Research (BMR) at the University of South Africa (Unisa) recently released the latest happiness index involving almost 3 500 graduates in South Africa. According to Prof Pierre Joubert (BMR Professor) the 2014 BMR survey shows that graduates are mostly satisfied with life, albeit at a marginally lower level than in 2013. In fact, graduates generally experience happiness with most spheres of life while their perceived standing in society improved significantly in 2014. However, they reported lower levels of being in control of their own lives due to an increased awareness of environmental factors. Generational differences were again evident in 2014 with the older generation expressing higher levels of subjective happiness, internal drive (locus of control) and standing in society, while less stress was also evident amongst this generation.

ARCHIVE NEWS