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LINGUISTICS

Major Combinations:
NQF Level 5: LIN1501, LIN1502
NQF Level 6: LIN2601, LIN2602, LIN2603
NQF Level 7: LIN3701, LIN3702, LIN3703, LIN3704, LIN3705

Learning and Teaching an Additional Language - LIN3703
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 7 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: The focus in this module is on learning and teaching an additional language. You will thus study both the theories of language learning as well as some important variables relating to the teaching of language. Practical applications and implications of this knowledge for both language learning and teaching will be considered.
Language Planning and Linguistic Description - LIN3704
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 7 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: To enable students to identify and characterise problems related to language planning and development in a multilingual society, with special reference to the development of standard languages in Africa, and the role of grammars and dictionaries.
Text Structure and Function - LIN3705
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 7 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: To introduce students to text linguistic skills that will enable them to identify what makes texts coherent, to recognise differences between spoken and written texts, to identify the sort of coherence and cohesion problems that may develop in the writing of texts, to explain why we understand some texts more easily than others, and to compare various types of written texts (e.g. narrative versus academic writing).
Issues and Factors in Applied Linguistics - HAPL481
Honours Year module NQF level: 8 Credits: 24
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: This module starts by introducing the discipline of applied linguistics and then looking in some detail at one key issue: the similarities and differences between the processes of first language and additional language acquisition. One of the most important questions the module addresses is how research has helped us to gain a better understanding of these similarities and differences and what relevance this research has for the language classroom. Much of the attention and energy in applied linguistics has gone into exploring what learning an additional language involves and what the best teaching methods are for promoting successful additional language learning. Yet despite our best theories, methods and intentions, we are still faced with individual differences between language learners. Some students are very successful in learning an additional language, some achieve only moderate success, while others do badly. Why? The focus in the second part of this module is on individual factors (i.e. factors internal to the students) that affect language learning ability. These include maturational, cognitive and affective factors.
Methods and Testing in Applied Linguistics - HAPL482
Honours Year module NQF level: 8 Credits: 24
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: In this module attention will first focus on a number of different language teaching methods. However, before a detailed study of any particular method, students will have the opportunity to examine some of the principles and theories that have informed both the study of language acquisition and learning and the development of different language teaching methods. Students will then critically compare and examine aspects of a number of different methods with a view to evaluating their relative weaknesses and strengths for particular situations with which they are familiar. The main objective here is to make students aware of the importance of following a principled approach in deciding on the method and procedures to be used in the classroom. The second main area of focus in this module is language assessment. Many changes have been proposed for education in South Africa and we draw attention to some of these changes, especially those that will play a role in language teaching and assessment. The major change is to outcomes based education (OBE), which represents a shift of emphasis from teacher input to learner achievement. To a great extent the aim of this module is to prepare students for the challenges envisaged by this change. For this module, students have to think about language testing against the background of the new language policy and assessment framework.
Reading and Writing in Applied Linguistics - HAPL483
Honours Year module NQF level: 8 Credits: 24
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: Most of the world's information and knowledge is stored in the written word, either as printed texts or as electronic texts. The ability to read gives one access to this information and knowledge, and in today's world, information is power. During the first two or so years of schooling, children learn to read and write, i.e. they are taught what the written symbols of language stand for and how to convey meaning via written symbols. Once children have learned to read, they are expected to read to learn. In other words, texts - the written word - become an important source for the acquisition of new knowledge and for learning. If students understand what they read, they can become independent learners. Yet there are many students who have problems really understanding what they read, and hence they also have problems reading to learn. Research has established that the most important skill needed in the learning context is the ability to read with understanding. This is especially true for learners who study through the medium of a language other than their first language (English is often the relevant medium). The first main focus in this module is on reading ability, especially reading in an additional language, at primary, secondary and tertiary level. Many of the tasks we have to perform in the learning or the work context involve writing, yet not everyone writes equally well and coherently. What does it mean to produce a coherent piece of writing, be it a letter of complaint, a history essay, a memo at work, a research article or a summary of decisions taken at a meeting - or a master's dissertation? The quality of written language being meaningful and unified is referred to as text coherence. Thus the second main focus in this module is on the ability to write coherently, also with regard to research that investigates the kinds of problems that students have to deal with when their academic writing needs to be done in what is for them an additional language.
Language Planning in Education - HAPL484
Honours Year module NQF level: 8 Credits: 12
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: To equip students with: (a) an informed and critical understanding of the key issues in language planning-in-education including the issue of choice of medium of instruction in multilingual societies, models of bilingual education for linguistic minorities and the educational implications of classroom code-switching; (b) an understanding of the educational language policy and the language planning process in order for them to define a language strategy for their respective work environments and engage themselves in the production of a bilingual or multilingual citizenry; (c) the ability to connect their understanding with their performance, so that they learn from their actions and are able to adapt to changes and unforeseen circumstances; and (d) the capacity to promote and implement a culture of language tolerance in a plurilingual or multilingual context. This module would also be useful for language teachers, other language professionals and all who use language because they need to be aware of language policy issues in a multilingual society.
Language Contact and Variation - HLIN481
Honours Year module NQF level: 8 Credits: 24
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: To enable students to gain insights into the relationships between language and society, and to apply current sociolinguistic theories to research. This module should be useful for language teachers and all who use language because they need to be aware of sociolinguistic variables in a multilingual society.
Cognitive Linguistics - HLIN482
Honours NQF level: 8 Credits: 24
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: To enable students to gain insights into the relationship between language and cognition, and to apply current cognitive linguistic theories on grammar and semantics to discourse-related research. This module would also be useful for anyone interested in the symbolic and interactive functions of language or related research pertaining to the meaning-making process as is done in other cognitive fields such as philosophy of mind and cognitive psychology.
Grammatical Patterns and Concepts - LIN1501
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 5 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: To enable students to define, identify and illustrate a set of basic grammatical (i.e. morphological and syntactic) concepts used in the description of language in general. The module is very practical in that it will help students to describe the basic structure of any language they choose to study.
Research Report in Linguistics - HRLIN81
Honours NQF level: 8 Credits: 36
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: To enable students to gain insights into research methodology, research ethics and conventions. This paper comprises four assignments, the last of which is a portfolio of evidence. This means that students will not write a formal examination in this paper. The portfolio will consist of a research proposal that will serve as the final assessment.
Multilingualism: the Role of Language in the South African Context - LIN1502
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 5 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: This module introduces you to language use in multilingual societies, equipping you to deal with actual language issues that you may come across in the South African context. This module is intended to provide insight into the way in which language functions both to separate and unite communities, and will cover topics such as children's acquisition of first and additional languages, bilingual schooling, language variation, language planning and cross cultural interaction.
Translation Method and Function - HTR4801
Honours NQF level: 8 Credits: 24
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: This module aims to teach students basic translation techniques and strategies. It covers topics such as: A functional approach to translation: 1. Professional translation: an act of communication; 2. Translation analysis and method. Equivalence at word level: 1. Meaning and translation/interpreting; 2. Problems of non-equivalence at word level; 3. Strategies to deal with non-equivalence at word level. Equivalence above word level: 1. Collocations, fixed expressions; idioms, metaphors; 2. Problems of non-equivalence above word level; 3. Strategies to deal with non-equivalence above word level. Equivalence at text level: 1. Principles of text linguistics (cohesion and coherence); 2. Text typology and text comparison; 3. Problems in obtaining equivalence at text level. Translation as intercultural activity: Practical translation of a variety of text types, e.g. journalistic texts; tourist brochures; biblical texts; public information brochures; editorials; Internet web pages. Practical interpreting of general oral texts will be an option from 2010.
Language Acquisition in a Natural Environment - LIN2601
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 6 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: Focusing on how children learn language in everyday environments, the module provides you with an overview of the developmental sequences children pass through during their first six years, from the babbling stage through to earliest words to more complex sentences. In addition to introducing various theories of how children acquire language, the module explores some unusual cases of language acquisition, for example in deaf or mentally challenged children, with a view to what these cases can tell us about the relationship between language and the brain.
Translation for Specific Purposes - HTR4802
Honours NQF level: 8 Credits: 24
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: The aim of this module is to expose students to aspects of lexicography and terminology and to equip them with knowledge and skills which they can apply when confronted with specialised texts. Topics that are covered include; Introduction to specialised translation/interpreting: 1. Categorising technical texts; 2. Specialised text types and translation methods; 3. Reformulating to a brief: making technical texts accessible. Terminology skills for translators and interpreters: 1. Terminology theory for translators and interpreters; 2. Collecting, processing and disseminating terminology; 3. Term formation processes; 4. Terminology standardisation; 5. Role of technical translation (also literary and Bible translation) in raising the status of a language; Translators, interpreters and lexicography: 1. Principles of lexicography; 2. Technical dictionaries; 3. Online dictionaries and spell-checkers. Introduction to Corpus-based Translation Studies: 1. Aspects of corpus linguistics; 2. Types of corpora; 3. Corpus tools and programmes; 4. Basic corpus research.
Language in a Changing World - LIN2602
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 6 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: This module examines the factors in society which cause languages to change, as well as attitudes towards language change and their implications for language planning and language practitioners. The phenomena of language shift and maintenance are also analysed.
Perspectives on Translation and Interpreting Studies - HTR4803
Honours NQF level: 8 Credits: 24
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: This module introduces students to some theoretical issues regarding translation and interpreting. The information provided in this module also forms a vital foundation for future postgraduate research at Masters or Doctoral level. Modern theoretical models of translation are covered, including: 1. Prescriptive translation theory to Descriptive Translation Studies and Corpus-based Translation Studies; 2. Functionalism in translation; 3. The cultural studies paradigm in translation studies; 4. Interpreting studies. Practical translation of a variety of financial texts and technical texts. Practical interpreting of technical texts and conference-level oral texts is also an option. Students specifically interested in Bible translation can contact the Department for Bible texts or other related texts.
Sound and Sound Structure - LIN2603
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 6 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: The aim of this module is to enable students to define, identify and illustrate a set of basic concepts used in the description of the sound structure of languages in general, and to relate the meaningful properties of sound structure to sound production and perception. The module is very practical in that it will help students to describe the basic sounds and sound structure of any language they choose to study.
Professional Practice - HTR4804
Honours NQF level: 8 Credits: 12
Module presented in English Module presented online
Purpose: In this module we aim to refine the student's practical translation skills and provide them with some information that will be useful to them in their careers as professional translators. This paper covers the following: Professional translation management; Language editing; Professional translation/interpreting practice; Ethics in translation. The last assignment in this paper is a non-venue-linked examination. This means that students do not have to write a formal exam in an exam venue, but may complete the assignment at home using dictionaries and other sources and then submit the assignment in the normal way.
Approaches in Linguistics - LIN3701
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 7 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: In this module you will be introduced to the basic structure of a linguistic theory. You will be taught to explain, compare and evaluate selected linguistic theories in the domains of syntax, semantics and/or phonology within the formal and functional traditions in linguistics.
Translation and Editing Techniques - LIN3702
Under Graduate Degree Semester module NQF level: 7 Credits: 12
Module presented in English
Purpose: This module introduces you to the professions of translation and editing. It aims to help you to identify and solve translation problems at word, sentence and text level, and gain insight into professional ethics, translating culture, and basic terminology theory. Various general text types are discussed, such as journalistic texts, written correspondence, public information leaflets, brochures and tourist information or equivalent module. General translation practice is covered in the module Translation and editing practice (see entries by individual language departments). Advice: It is recommended that you register for a module which focuses on translation practice with a language department after completing this module or together with it. You may also decide to take Creative writing and literary translation (African Languages only) or the module on text skills (Basiese Teksvaardighede (AFK1502) in the Department of Afrikaans. Full professional qualifications in translation are offered at postgraduate level. It is recommended that you translate into your mother tongue/first language. You may take any language in combination with English or Afrikaans, for example English into Zulu, Afrikaans into English, but not Spanish into German or Zulu into Tsonga. This is a market related decision: most translations have English as either source or target language. It is recommended that you combine this module with any relevant language module.