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The Seeds of Separate Development: Origins of Bantu Education

Displaced

Author:

Cynthia Kros

Published:

2010

ISBN:

978-1-86888-552-0

Number of pages:

Pp 214,  soft cover

Prices:

South Africa: R210 (incl VAT) | Africa: R221 | USD: $30| GBP: £21  | Euro: € 24

Contact

Laetitia Theart: Thearl@unisa.ac.za

 

About the book

As the memory of Apartheid recedes,it becomes ever harder to capture what philosopher Hannah Arendt might have described as its appearance of normality – which is not to deny in any sense that it was a cruel and destructive system which has left a deeply ingrained legacy of bitterness and harm in its wake. But, how was it that so many people who thought of themselves as just and decent citizens subscribed to the ideas of Apartheid, and believed that it was the only way in which South Africa’s many diverse ‘communities’ could live in harmony? This book, through tracking the intellectual development of one of Apartheid’s deftest ideologues, W. W. M. Eiselen, explores how the seeds of separate development were sown in at least one quarter of Apartheid’s toxic fields, and the conditions under which they began to take root.

Table of contents

Acknowledgements

ii

Table of Contents

vii

INTRODUCTION

1

Why Not a Biography?

2

The Politics of Knowledge

9

Mixing Modes of Analysis?

10

What Follows…

11

CHAPTER ONE

REVISING NATION AND NATIONALISM

12

Introduction.

12

On Nation and Nationalism

12

An Early Digression

14

O’Meara Revisited

15

Giliomee’s Retort

17

Discourse Theory?

19

Hyslop and Education History

21

Taking Ideas Seriously

23

Conclusion

26

CHAPTER TWO

SON OF THE BERLIN MISSION

27

Introduction

27

The Impact of the BMS

28

‘Place of Refuge’-- Botshabelo

29

The Press Battle

33

The Turning Point

42

The Naturellevraagstuk

43

Conclusion

46

CHAPTER THREE

THE STELLENBOSCH ACADEMIC

48

Introduction

48

Eiselen and the English-speaking anthropologists?

48

Not Quite at Home

52

The Anthropology of the ‘Changing Native’

54

Inter-War Optimism

61

Face-Off

66

Conclusion

68

CHAPTER FOUR

CHIEF INSPECTOR OF NATIVE EDUCATION

69

Introduction

69

Eiselen Leaves Academia

69

The Impasse

71

Not at Peace

72

Eiselen the Afrikaner Nationalist?

76

The Taalstryd (Language Struggle)

78

The Other Language Struggle

80

A Feeble Bureaucrat?

85

Conclusion

87

CHAPTER FIVE

THE 1940S – CHANGING HORIZONS

89

Introduction

89

Economic Features

89

The UP Government and its Advisers

91

SEPC’s Report Number Nine

95

Smit and the DNA

99

The Smit Report

100

Smit and the ‘New Hotheads’

102

Conclusion

103

CHAPTER SIX

THE RIOT AT LOVEDALE

105

Introduction

105

Not only Sugar

105

The Riot

107

Not the ‘bumptious’ City Lad

109

Domestication of the Elite?

111

Not the Lambeth Walk

113

But Where Did They Get Their Ideas?

115

Conclusion

117

CHAPTER SEVEN

PRELUDE TO THE EISELEN COMMISSION

119

Introduction

119

Fagan

120

Sauer

123

The Fagan Critics

125

Appointment of the Eiselen Commission

128

Conclusion

128

CHAPTER EIGHT

THE EISELEN COMMISSION AND ITS REPORT

133

Members of the Commission

133

The Commission’s Work

136

Social Planning

138

Findings

140

Culture

142

The Report: Culture, Development and Modernity

148

The Report and the Curriculum

151

The Report and Administrative Structures

153

The Report and Mother Tongue Instruction

154

Conclusion

155

AFTERWORD

158

NOTES

162

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

191