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Unisa Press

Time, space and pace: computer-integrated education in South Africa

Author   Rabelani Dagada
Foreword by Prof Mthuli Ncube
Unisa Press
Format  245 x 165 mm (Laminated softcover)
Pages  x + 158
Publish Year October 2009
ISBN  978-1-86888-459-9

SA price: R250,00 (VAT incl)
Rest of the world:
Africa: R260,00 (Airmail incl)
US$42.00 (Airmail incl)
GB ₤24.00 (Airmail incl)
€32.00(Airmail incl)

Keywords: Computer-integrated education (CIE), South African corporate environment

Description
Computer-integrated education (CIE)is poised to become the new training paradigm, taking its place alongside traditional contact situation training and changing the face of training generally.

This book focuses on CIE within the South African corporate environment, while its findings are also transferable to other countries, institutions of higher learning and the public sector.

Increasinlgly, managers and facilitators are using various strategies, techniques and computer-integrated tools in their endeavour to integrate online learning into their training environment.
This competence holds great promise for the future of productivity in this country.

This book synthesises the author’s experience, literature and research. Sections that reflect analysed data, especially those derived from interviews in South African corporate environment, are integrated with the literature review. The author has also used case studies from various sources to contextualise certain assertions, claims, reports, arguments and findings.

More about the book
Computer-integrated education (CIE)is poised to become the new training paradigm, taking its place alongside traditional contact situation training and changing the face of training generally. A number of trends – which include technological developments, the growth of the Internet, legislation and business imperatives — have accelerated the move to CIE in the corporate world.

While this book is based focused in the South African corporate environment, its findings are transferable to other countries, institutions of higher learning and the public sector. The organisations investigated were fairly competent in integrating CIE for human resources development in the corporate training environment.

Increasinlgly, managers and facilitators are using various strategies, techniques and computer-integrated tools in their endeavour to integrate online learning into their training environment.
This competence holds great promise for the future of productivity in South African organisations.

Several authors claim that CIE will ultimately become the new training paradigm, taking its place alongside traditional contact situation training and changing the face of training generally. A number of trends – which include technological developments, the growth of the Internet, legislation and business imperatives — have accelerated the move to CIE in the corporate world.

Chapters 1 and 2 provide a brief overview of CIE. These chapters also reflect the context of South African education, training and development. The roles of the Constitution and other legislation and imperatives in driving CIE are dealt with. In chapter 2, the author claims that CIE can play a major role in solving problems such as unemployment, the shortage of a skilled labour force, underdevelopment, poverty and other social ills.

Chapter 3 focuses on organisational issues that should be considered when implementing CIE. The author argues that CIE should not be carried out in isolation from other business functions. The author’s assertions are backed up by literature and analysed data from the South African corporate environment.

Chapter 4 addresses tools and strategies for CIE. It shows how the organisations employed various computer-integrated strategies and tools to transform education, training and development. The chapter also shows how certain factors in corporate training environment affect learners’ proficiencies.

Chapter 5 deals with issues related to the quality assurance of CIE as required by South African legislation. It reflects measures that the organisations employed to ensure the quality of computerintegrated courses.

Chapter 6 and 7 deal with computer-integrated assessment (CIA) concepts, philosophical underpinnings and types of questions directed at learners.

Chapter 8 provides the final word and conclusion to the book.
While this book is based focused in the South African corporate environment, its findings may be transferable to other countries, institutions of higher learning and the public sector. This book appears to indicate that the organisations investigated were fairly competent in integrating CIE for human resources development in the corporate training environment. Managers and facilitators were using various strategies, techniques and computer-integrated tools in their endeavour to integrate online learning into their training environment. This competence holds great promise for the future of productivity in South African organisations. Thoughts and ideas expressed and recommended in this book will make a difference only if they are tested and implemented.

How to use this book
This book synthesises the author’s experience, literature and research. Sections that reflect analysed data, especially those derived from interviews in South African corporate environment, are integrated with the literature review. The author has also used case studies from various sources to contextualize certain assertions, claims, reports, arguments and findings.

About the Author
Prof. Rabelani Dagada was educated at the University of Johannesburg and the University of the Witwatersrand. He holds the degrees of Master of Education in Computer-based Education and Master of Commerce in Information Systems. He has also completed short courses at the University of South Africa (on management) and the University of London (on online education and training).

The author has worked as a college teacher, head of department for information technology, instructional designer, and Manager: ICT and Knowledge Management. He is a council member of the South African Institute of Computer Scientists and Information Technologists (SAICSIT). He is also a member of the Computer Society of South Africa. He has presented papers at national and international conferences and has published extensively. His passion for human development has led him into community development initiatives and labour union activities.

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Extract from the book
From the Foreword

For some time Dagada has studied and focused on the main challenges, broadening and detailing an outline of interventions that computers can adopt to better address the transformation of human resources development through computer education and training. He does not merely espouse the benefits of computers, but reflects on their weaknesses in the training and learning environment. He avoids singling out the use of computers for human resources development as a panacea for our skills shortages and poor productivity.

Dagada could not have chosen a better time. The South African telecommunications and broadcasting sectors are going through a transformation phase of convergence. All existing licences issued in terms of separate telecommunications and broadcasting legislative frameworks are being reviewed and will be reissued in terms of electronic communications legislation.

The picture that the author paints and some of the key aspect he raises are of interventions brought about by the South African government in its endeavours to address skills shortages. Further, he assesses the impact that these programmes have had and their challenges.

Dagada investigates the aggressive drive and introduction of the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA) and the Joint Initiative for Priority Skills Acquisition (JIPSA) and their impact on transforming human resources development through computer-integrated education and training. In a nutshell, this book is about time, space and pace with regard to learning.

I have no doubt that readers will find this book inspiring and educating. We at iBurst will continue to add value to the human resources development of this country by providing Internet connections to thousands of public schools and further education and training institutions in previously disadvantaged parts of South Africa. In line with the gist of this book, we are helping to set up multi-purpose community centres.

Thami Mtshali (MSc, Tuskege University, Alabama)
Chief Executive Officer
IBurst Group (Wireless Business Solutions)